Law, Policy & Society
Tue, 01/25/2022 — LAWRENCE – “We are trying to put ancient America on the map.” That is what John Hoopes, University of Kansas professor of anthropology, said about two deeply researched and richly illustrated volumes that he co-wrote and co-edited detailing archaeological finds from Nicaragua down to Ecuador held in the collection of Dumbarton Oaks Museum. The first of the books is a 5-pound, 2-inch-thick catalog of the museum’s pre-Columbian art collection, titled “Pre-Columbian Art from Central America and Colombia at Dumbarton Oaks.” It is the fifth such catalog that the Washington, D.C., museum has published, following books about its collections of Maya, Olmec, Mexican and

Mon, 01/24/2022 — LAWRENCE – In the new book she co-edited and co-wrote, “Racism by Another Name” (Information Age Publishing, 2021), Dorothy Hines contends that race has been the American public schools’ most profound legacy because it is one of society’s deepest fears. “From Ahmaud Arbery, who was murdered February 2020 in Georgia for jogging while Black, to Breonna Taylor, who was killed by police in March 2020 in Kentucky, Black people and especially Black children are seeing individuals who look like them being gunned down on national television,” Hines said. “But what happens to Black students with disabilities whose experiences often are not captured on the national news or

Mon, 01/24/2022 —  Four University of Kansas faculty members on the Lawrence and Medical Center campuses are this year’s recipients of the Higuchi-KU Endowment Research Achievement Awards, the state higher education system’s most prestigious recognition for...

Mon, 01/24/2022 — In the United States, China is increasingly targeted as the scapegoat for any problem involving the economy. But one of the nation’s political parties has embraced the rhetoric of China-bashing to a much greater degree, according to new...

Thu, 01/20/2022 — One of only three federally funded longitudinal data projects of national significance that collects and analyzes how public funds are expended on services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has moved to the University...

Tue, 01/18/2022 — LAWRENCE – Two third-year students at the University of Kansas School of Law will receive grants from the Kansas Farm Bureau Legal Foundation. Mary McMullen and Luke Sunderland are recipients of the foundation's Rural Law Practice Grant. The grant is awarded to law students who intend to practice in rural Kansas after graduation, bringing legal information and advocacy to those with limited access to resources. A maximum of three students each year can win the $16,500 grant. “Serving rural Kansas in the law is important to me because rural Kansas needs lawyers and better access to justice, and I felt that was a need I could contribute to,” said McMullen, who plans

Tue, 01/11/2022 — LAWRENCE – Even before creating a constitution, the first thing the victorious revolutionaries of the People’s Republic of China did was pass the New Marriage Law in 1950, giving women equal rights and creating a fundamentally feminist legal framework compared to the patriarchal system of Confucianism they had wiped away. It was part of a 20th century wave of “socialist feminism,” which itself was one of many successive approaches to female empowerment that make up the title subject of a new book co-created by a University of Kansas scholar. “Feminisms with Chinese Characteristics” (Syracuse University Press) was co-edited and co-written by Hui “Faye” Xiao,

Mon, 01/10/2022 — LAWRENCE – As the 36th annual observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day nears on Jan. 17, two University of Kansas professors are available to comment on its significance – always, but particularly in the wake of challenges to American democracy. Randal Maurice Jelks is a professor of African & African-American studies and American studies at KU, an author and documentary film producer, as well as a Presbyterian clergyman. He has written three books, and his fourth, “Letters to Martin: Meditations on Democracy in Black America” (Chicago Review Press, 2022), will be published Jan. 11. It’s a heartfelt cry of concern about the state of American democracy, framed

Tue, 01/04/2022 — LAWRENCE – Randal Maurice Jelks is a University of Kansas professor, author and documentary film producer as well as a Presbyterian clergyman. He has written three books, and his fourth will be released Jan. 11. Each of his books deals with a different aspect of Black American and U.S. civil rights history. But his latest, “Letters to Martin: Meditations on Democracy in Black America” (Lawrence Hill Books/Chicago Review Press), is different. It’s a heartfelt appeal about American democracy, framed as a series of letters to Martin Luther King Jr. to provide some of his inspiration to today’s younger generations. In the book’s introduction, Jelks traces its central

Tue, 01/04/2022 — The University of Kansas Public Management Center has announced its new class of graduates of the Heartland Certified Public Manager (CPM) program. The graduation ceremony took place Dec. 3, 2021, in the House Chamber of the Kansas Capitol. Ed...

Mon, 12/20/2021 — LAWRENCE – In a new book chapter, two University of Kansas researchers challenge the notion that Ivan Goncharov was the most conservative Russian writer of his time. Rather, they assert, Goncharov’s treatment of a nihilistic character in his 1869 novel “The Precipice” reveals a certain sympathy with a “queer” approach to “normal” family life. It’s not that the character Mark Volokhov is homosexual. Rather, it’s his devil-may-care attitude toward then-typical gender roles, along with any other societal norm. Ani Kokobobo, associate professor and chair of the University of Kansas Department of Slavic and Eurasian Languages & Literatures, and Devin Culley

Thu, 12/16/2021 — How might human-driven climate change trigger food shortages, water scarcity, armed conflict or future pandemics? Conversely, could a changing environment strengthen bonds of community in some places? A group of scientists recently delivered a...

Wed, 12/15/2021 —  University of Kansas researchers have secured a grant to help support children’s relatives and family members to care for them when they are removed from their parents’ home and placed in the foster system. The project, known as Kansas...

Fri, 12/10/2021 — With a new fellowship in hand, Jaleah Cullors will have the opportunity to jump-start her career plans with a stipend for graduate school and the opportunity to work in the U.S. Foreign Service. The senior at the University of Kansas is double...

Thu, 12/09/2021 — As language itself is becoming one of the nation’s most divisive battlegrounds, for certain communities, it’s ground zero. “The word ‘transgender,’ initially meant to offer visibility and acceptance to the bearer, has now become a...

Wed, 12/08/2021 — When South Korean President Park Geun-hye was impeached and removed from office in 2017, the movement that preceded it looked similar to other political maneuvers around the globe: Traditional media, social media, everyday citizens, politicians,...

Tue, 12/07/2021 — LAWRENCE – Pope Francis is the first Jesuit to lead the Catholic Church. That’s one rather large indication that, as scholar Patricia Manning sees it, the priestly Society of Jesus has overcome the forces that suppressed them during the 18th century. The many-sided controversies of the period of suppression that culminated in the Jesuits being expelled from Spain in 1767 and disbanded by Pope Clement XIV in 1773 are the subject of Manning’s new book, “An Overview of the Pre-Suppression Society of Jesus in Spain” (Brill, 2021). Manning is an associate professor in the University of Kansas Department of Spanish & Portuguese. In addition to the Inquisition and

Mon, 12/06/2021 — A major report will be made public today by the Lancet Commission on the future of care and clinical research on autism. One of its key authors, Brian Boyd, associate professor of applied behavioral science at the University of Kansas and...

Mon, 12/06/2021 — LAWRENCE – D.C. Hiegert, a 2021 graduate of the University of Kansas School of Law, will serve as a 2022 Skadden Fellow. Considered the most prestigious and competitive award for public interest law graduates, Skadden Fellowships provide two years of funding for lawyers pursuing public-interest law projects of their own design. Hiegert is one of 28 judicial clerks and graduating law students across the country to receive a Skadden Fellowship. During the fellowship, Hiegert will work with the ACLU of Kansas to provide direct representation, community education and policy advocacy for LGBTQ+ Kansans to enforce and strengthen state and federal legal protections. The

Fri, 12/03/2021 — LAWRENCE – A pair of University of Kansas School of Law students will head to New York City this spring to participate in the national round of the 72nd annual National Moot Court Competition. Third-year law students Grace Tran and Alec Feather bested teams from the University of Oklahoma, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Oklahoma City University during the regionals competition to clinch a spot in the national round. The duo will represent KU Law in New York City at the national finals of the moot court competition in late January. Feather credited Pamela Keller, clinical professor of law and director of KU Law’s Moot Court Program, for supporting the team


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