Law, Policy & Society
Thu, 01/30/2020 — A new center for excellence at the University of Kansas School of Law aims to foster diversity within the law school community. The Dru Mort Sampson Center for Diversity and Inclusion, launched in late fall 2019, will encourage community...

Thu, 01/30/2020 — The University of Kansas School of Law’s Legal Aid Clinic and the Douglas County District Attorney's Office are hosting the fourth annual Clean Slate Expungement Clinic from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7. The free clinic will be held at the...

Wed, 01/29/2020 — LAWRENCE – Allan Pasco has taught French at the University of Kansas for more than 30 years, and he has learned that the short story is ever more relevant to today’s time-crunched students – and to their professors. Thus, the title of Pasco’s 11th book is “The Nineteenth-Century French Short Story: Masterpieces in Miniature,” part of a series from publisher Routledge on 19th-century lit. It is intended mainly for Pasco’s colleagues in academe. He urges them to make use of the short story’s compact nature to impress upon their students concepts such as “metaphoric detail, image and sequential structures, allusions, frames, cycles and open conclusions.” Pasco, who

Tue, 01/28/2020 — Abortion remains among the most polarizing topics in America. Despite the perceived notion of legality, actual access has become increasingly restrictive due to shadowy and deceptive control mechanisms, according to a new research...

Mon, 01/27/2020 — LAWRENCE – Playwright Darren Canady shocks audiences by opening his new two-act drama, “Reparations,” with a scene of a lynching. But he leavens that tragedy with later scenes of the love and dedication that sustained African Americans through centuries of trial, even offering an Afro-Futuristic vision of hope. Seattle’s Sound Theatre Company opened “Reparations” Jan. 8 at the city’s Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute. It runs through Feb. 2. An associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Kansas, Canady leans into challenging subject matter like “Black Butterflies,” his 2017 critique of the school-to-prison pipeline ensnaring

Fri, 01/24/2020 — LAWRENCE – The Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas has announced its programming lineup for the spring 2020 semester. Guests include award-winning scholars, a New York Times bestselling author, leading political strategists, global experts on spycraft in the 21st century and the Belgian ambassador to the United States, to mention but a few. “This semester, we bring a full slate of world-class experts and leaders to Lawrence,” said Director Bill Lacy. “We have former senior members of the U.S. State Department, the CIA, a presidential speechwriter and an ambassador. We also look forward to announcing our distinguished guests for the Dole

Fri, 01/24/2020 — The University of Kansas Libraries will open a new exhibition in the Haricombe Gallery this February. “Rightfully Yours: KU Campus and Community Scholars Consider U.S. Voting Rights” is developed in conjunction with KU’s centennial...

Thu, 01/23/2020 — Patricia Sattler served as the statewide victim assistance coordinator for the Nebraska Department of Justice  for the last eight years of a 16-year practice career, so she’s seen firsthand how it can be difficult for law enforcement officers...

Thu, 01/23/2020 —  The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has long operated programs designed to help low-income individuals and families find housing in “high-opportunity” neighborhoods where they would have access to good schools, employment...

Thu, 01/23/2020 — President Trump and Vice Premier Liu He of China met last week to sign a “phase one” trade deal. Jack Zhang, assistant professor of political science at the University of Kansas, is available to discuss this significant event with...

Thu, 01/23/2020 — Jeff Goldblum’s character in “Jurassic Park” famously popularized the concept of chaos theory as it relates to science. But one University of Kansas professor is applying that theory to the economy. William Barnett, the Oswald...

Tue, 01/21/2020 — What cause are you willing to put your life on the line for? What if might be a futile gesture? Would you be in the streets today in Hong Kong? And what are you doing about the 1 million Uighur Muslims being forced into detention camps in...

Wed, 01/15/2020 — published in 1989 as the Iron Curtain was collapsing — Russia remains a strategic threat to Western democracy. One need only look at the ...

Wed, 01/15/2020 —  The United States and China announced they would sign an initial trade deal today, easing a two-year economic fight between the world’s two largest economies. Terms of the deal are said to include an opening of Chinese markets to more...

Tue, 01/14/2020 — Twenty-two new law enforcement officers graduated from the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center (KLETC) on Dec. 20. Independence Police Chief Jerry Harrison was the speaker for the ceremony in KLETC’s Integrity Auditorium. The new officers...

Tue, 01/14/2020 — During the 1940s, the U.S. government commissioned a series of documentary films called “Why We Fight” to spur public support for World War II. Now two Army veterans have launched their own creative project titled “Why We Write: Craft...

Mon, 01/13/2020 — LAWRENCE – You know that old saw about how doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result constitutes insanity? Well, a new paper by researchers in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Kansas doesn’t go that far, but it does conclude that to counter anti-vaccine beliefs, those who favor universal vaccination against contagious diseases will have to do more than repeat the evidence denying the link between the MMR vaccine and autism. Instead, they will have to meet anti-vaxxers where they are: on contested ground where anecdotes, examples and conspiracy theories hold greater sway than scientific evidence. Brett Bricker,

Mon, 01/13/2020 — More than a hundred University of Kansas students were initiated into the KU chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi at the end of the fall 2019 semester. Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest and most selective honor society for students...

Mon, 01/13/2020 — Transgender rights have made significant progress in recent years thanks to court decisions and high-profile transgender individuals putting a spotlight on the issue. Much discrimination still exists, though, especially for young people without...

Thu, 01/09/2020 — LAWRENCE – The University of Kansas School of Law community is mourning the passing of former dean and longtime professor Martin Dickinson, who died Jan. 5 in Estes Park, Colorado. He was 81. Dickinson was KU Law’s longest-serving faculty member. He gave 48 years to the law school, from when he started teaching in 1967 until his retirement in 2015. He served as dean from 1971 to 1980, overseeing a time period that included the dedication of the law school’s current home at Green Hall. He was a visionary leader, advocating for the advancement of diverse and female law students and faculty well before the legal profession as a whole began to do so, said Stephen


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